©
I know nothing about haikus
too uncreative

and too lazy to come up

with something decent


2 3 4

asylum-art:

Kevin Champeny

Artist on Tumblr | on Facebook

"What Remains"
60” wide x 48” tall x 1” deep
35,000+ hand cast urethane flowers

grizzlygains:

happyhalloweekes:

spoopy-shanin:

I’m not too late for the cute lil ghosts, right?

Of course you have to drag it and be amazed

THIS IS THE BEST ONE YET

grizzlygains:

happyhalloweekes:

spoopy-shanin:

I’m not too late for the cute lil ghosts, right?

Of course you have to drag it and be amazed

THIS IS THE BEST ONE YET

plasmatics-life:

NYC Sunset [via/more] By Itoodmuk

plasmatics-life:

NYC Sunset [via/more] By Itoodmuk

newsweek:

New York City’s five boroughs first became Jeff Chen-Hsing Liao’s subjects when he moved to the U.S. from Taiwan in 1999 at the age of 22.

It was the city’s ever-changing landscape that fascinated the young photographer. “Every other week, you go to the same spot and something’s different,” Liao tells Newsweek. “New York is one of the most diverse cities—there are so many different cultures that blend into New York.”

To capture that culture, he photographed the same spot over the course of a day and combined the images.

See more of Liao’s images at Newsweek.com

SAINT LAURENT / COLLECTION XIV opening.

blacksmithseye:

Cyan, magenta…

blacksmithseye:

Cyan, magenta…

s-u-r-f-i-s-m:

nothumanapproval:

ily marshall

Ilym marsh

archiemcphee:

We see clouds so often that it’s easy to forget how amazing they are. Thankfully German astronaut and geophysicist Alexander Gerst is currently aboard the International Space Station where he often spends his free time taking countless extraordinary photos of the Earth as it’s whizzing by 205 miles below.

Gerst is particularly fond of photographing dramatic shadows cast by cloud formations - something that we cannot see down here on Earth. These stunning photos remind how awesome clouds are as they cast shadows that stretch for thousands of miles across the planet’s surface. Shadows so long that they eventually disappear into the black horizon.

Follow Alexander Gerst’s Twitter feed for new photos shared daily.

[via Colossal]